Nutrition.gov (US)

Prevalence and Profile of High Impact Chronic Pain

Almost 11 million U.S. adults have “High Impact Chronic Pain”—that is, pain that has lasted 3 months or longer and is accompanied by at least one major activity restriction, such as being unable to work outside the home, go to school, or do household chores.

Highlighting Recent NCCIH Pain-Research News: Part 2

In this blog post, Acting NCCIH Director Dr. David Shurtleff discusses highlights from the 2018 symposium, “From Science to Society: At the Intersection of Chronic Pain Management and the Opioid Crisis” & invites people to attend a one-day pain symposium co-sponsored by NCCIH on Tuesday, September 11, 2018 in advance of the World Congress on Pain.

Highlighting Recent NCCIH Pain-Research News: Part 2

In this blog post, Acting NCCIH Director Dr. David Shurtleff discusses highlights from the 2018 symposium, “From Science to Society: At the Intersection of Chronic Pain Management and the Opioid Crisis” & invites people to attend a one-day pain symposium co-sponsored by NCCIH on Tuesday, September 11, 2018 in advance of the World Congress on Pain.

Highlighting Recent NCCIH Pain-Research News: Part 1

In this blog post, Acting NCCIH Director Dr. David Shurtleff discusses NCCIH and NIH plans that focus on the opioid epidemic and problems with which it is often associated: pain; chronic pain; substance misuse and addiction; and mental health problems. 

7 Tips for Cleaning Fruits, Vegetables

Fresh produce can become contaminated in many ways, but following these simple steps can help protect you and your family from foodborne illness.

To K or Not To K?

Applying for a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Career Development Award (or K award)? Read this for more information.

To K or Not To K?

Applying for a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Career Development Award (or K award)? Read this for more information.

6 Things to Know About Travel-Related Ailments and Complementary Health Approaches

People planning to travel internationally are often interested in complementary or integrative health approaches for travel-related illnesses and conditions. Some of these approaches for travel-related health problems are promoted widely in advertising or marketed on the Internet. However, little of this information is supported by research evidence, and some of it is misleading or false. Here are 6 things to know if you are considering using herbal remedies, dietary supplements, or other complementary health approaches for travel-related ailments and hazards.

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